Diabetes Awareness Campaign: Trekking Along the Erie Canal.
North Tonawanda
Pendleton
Lockport
Medina
Albion
Brockport
Rochester
Rochester
Fairport
Macedon
Palmyra
Newark
Lyons
Weedsport
Jordan
Camillus
Syracuse
DeWitt
Chittenango
Canastota
Canastota
Durhamville
Oneida
Rome
Utica
Ilion
Herkimer
Little Falls
Canajoharie
St. Johnsville
Auriesville
Amseterdam
Schenectady
Schenectady
Colonie
Albany
Friday, October 26
Canajoharie
Canajoharie.
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When a walked back on Route 5 to the bridge which connected Palatine Hill with Canajoharie, I spotted an image that has been a powerful American icon—the red BEECH-NUT sign atop a white building in Canajoharie. When I flew by in my car on I-90 on my way to college in Ohio, I was always sort of marveled how the popular candy and gum would have been made within such a hamlet. I always liked Life Savers, my favorite being Butterscotch. To this day I still keep a roll in my car’s glove box in case I go “hypo.” The candy and gum divisions were sold off in 1968.
Beech-Nut started out in 1891 as the Imperial Packing Company canning smoked ham and bacon. In 1899 in incorporated as the Beech-Nut Packing Company. Later the company used a family to make grape jam. Coffee peanut butter, and macaroni soon became staple products.
Postcard.
Postcard circa 1910
In 1931 Life Savers Limited acquired the company and produced candy and gum. That same year the company began making baby food. It was an innovator by combining its invention, a vacuum seal cap, and glass jars to package baby food. Originally the jars were green but soon were changed to the clear glass still used today.
Today baby food is the company’s only product. In the 70s, Beech-Nut became the first baby food made without salt and, in the 90s, the fist without added sugar.
Cannery.
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Four miles east of Canajoharie I came to Monk Road where lie the remains of Lock 31 of the Enlarged Erie canal at the village of Sprakers.
Silas W. Cohen & Bro.
Silas W. Cohen & Bro.
This was the site of Cohen’s Store which advertised itself as the “biggest and best canal store on the Erie” where they sold “Anything & Everything” for passengers, crews, and animals. Another important feature for the era—it was “always open.”
The only building left is the Post Office.
Double locks at Sprakers.
Double locks at Sprakers
Sprakers' Post Office.
Sprakers' Post Office
Just about a mile east of Sprakers, I was able to get a good look of the geological formation as the noses.
Little Nose.
Little Nose
Big Nose.
Big Nose
These are the opposing sides of the escarpment sliced my thousands millennia of erosion from the Mohawk River. The trail at this point was nestled in close to the mountain on the remains of an old rail road bed which ran parallel to the Erie Canal. The remains of the canal had long since been obliterated by Interstate 90.
As I walked along the path went under Little Nose, all I could think about was the many FALLING ROCK signs that have seen on my travels. I hoped that it wasn’t a runny nose!
About eight mile later the trail came out of the lee of the escarpment and the out skirts of Fultonville where I came to a run down building which once had been a busy train depot.
Former train depot.
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It was late and I was hungry so I went search of a meal. Afterwards I made some calls to find a room for the night. Once I made my reservation, I called Jerie to let her know I had a room and where to rendezvous later that night. Next, I called a cab to take me to the motel.
 
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